TransCarotid Artery Revascularization

TCAR Procedure

Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and it is estimated that carotid artery disease (plaque buildup) is the cause of up to a third of the stroke cases. Traditionally, these patients were typically treated with open surgery – carotid endarterectomy. Now there is a less-invasive treatment option, TransCarotid Artery Revascularization (TCAR), that is clinically proven to decrease the risks of stroke and safer than stenting approached through the groin.

Northside’s vascular surgery program was one of the first in the state to offer this less invasive approach for stroke prevention.

TCAR vs CEA Scars

Dr. Siddharth Patel, of Northside Vascular Surgery,  is a leading surgeon for the TCAR procedure and is involved with continued innovation to further improve upon already excellent outcomes. He serves on the nationally recognized faculty that is tasked with the education and training of graduates and established vascular surgeons on how to perform TCAR and utilize best practices. Because of our early adoption, our surgeons have a skill-set unmatched in performing this procedure and our facility has been designated a Center of Excellence.

The unique difference with the TCAR procedure is that blood flow is temporarily redirected away from the brain and cycled through a filter to catch any small bits of plaque that may break away. A stent is implanted directly into the carotid artery to stabilize the plaque and prevent future strokes. Once the stent is successfully placed, blood flow resumes its normal direction. While any repair of the carotid artery carries some risks of causing a stroke, the incident rate is significantly lower with TCAR.

 

TransCarotid Artery Revascularization (TCAR)


Benefits of a Less Invasive Approach

  • Less Risk of Myocardial Infarction
  • Less Risk of Cranial Nerve Injury
  • Less Time in OR
  • Less Time in Hospital <1 day
  • More Likely to Discharge Home
  • Less Clamp Time
  • Ability to Perform Procedure with Local Anesthesia vs. General Anesthesia

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Key Statistics

  Statement
Every year, 15 million people worldwide suffer a stroke, also known as a brain attack
Reference Statement
Annually, 15 million people worldwide suffer a stroke. Of these, 5 million die and another 5 million are left permanently disabled, placing a burden on family and community.
Source
World Health Organization EMRO
  Statement
Every year, about as many Americans have a stroke as a heart attack
Reference Statement
Each year, about as many Americans have a stroke as a heart attack
Source
American Stroke Association
  Statement
Often called the silent killer, the first symptom of a patient at risk for stroke is a stroke itself
Reference Statement
Nearly 800,000 (approximately 795,000) people in the United States have a stroke every year, with about three in four being first time strokes. Stroke is the No. 5 cause of death in the United States, killing 130,000 people a year.
Source
American Stroke Association Heart and Stroke Statistics
  Statement
Every year, stroke kills 6 million and another 5 million are permanently disabled
Reference Statement
An estimated 17.7 million people died from CVDs in 2015, representing 31% of all global deaths. Of these deaths, an estimated 7.4 million were due to coronary heart disease and 6.7 million were due to stroke.
Source
World Health Organization CVD Fact Sheet
  Statement
87% of strokes are caused by blocked arteries
Reference Statement
Ischemic stroke accounts for about 87 percent of all cases.
Source
American Stroke Association Ischemic Strokes (Clots)
  Statement
Up to 1/3 of strokes are caused by carotid artery disease
Reference Statement
Carotid stenosis is responsible for up to one-third of all strokes.
Source
Society for Vascular Surgery
  Statement
People with diabetes are 2-4 times more likely to have a stroke
Reference Statement
High blood sugar can make you 2-4 times more likely to have a stroke. People with diabetes are up to four times more likely to have a stroke than people who don’t.
Source
WebMD - What Can Prevent A Stroke?
  Statement
About 1 in 5 people who suffer a stroke have A-fib
Reference Statement
And an irregular atrial heart rhythm — a condition called atrial fibrillation — is present in about one out of five strokes.
Source
American Heart Association - High Blood Pressure, AFIB and Your Risk of Stroke
  Statement
In people having a stroke for the first time, 3/4 have high blood pressure
Reference Statement
About three out of four people who have a stroke for the first time have high blood pressure.
Source
American Heart Association - High Blood Pressure, AFIB and Your Risk of Stroke